Apples, Pears, Leafy Green Vegetables Lower Risk Of Stroke

greenlettuceDoctors Health Press, a division of Lombardi Publishing Corporation and publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a new study finding that apples, pear, and leafy green vegetables can lower the risk of stroke. The study was published in the March 2013 issue of Atherosclerosis.

As Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/food-and-nutrition-articles/a-fat-that-makes-you-live-longer) notes, Swedish researchers recently conducted a study that looked at fruit and vegetable consumption and stroke risk. Fruits and vegetables contain a huge portion of the nutrients needed for a healthy heart, such as vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals (in the form of antioxidants), dietary fiber, and carotenoids.

As the article “A Fat That Makes You Live Longer?” reports, to assess just how much eating fruits and veggies could impact the heart health of men and women, the Swiss research team followed 74,961 people starting way back in 1997. Over the course of many years, the researchers collected data regarding the participants’ dietary habits. None of the participants showed signs of heart disease or cancer at the outset of the study and none had suffered a stroke.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article states that by the end of the study, more than 4,000 participants had suffered a stroke. Comparing fruit and vegetable intake with stroke risk, here’s what the researchers found: the relative risk of having a stroke was cut almost in half for people with the highest consumption of fruits and vegetables. There was one caveat, however: this was true only for those who weren’t suffering from hypertension throughout the study.

The articles adds that in the study, three foods stood out when it came to protecting the heart: apples, pears, and green leafy vegetables were the best for preventing strokes.

(SOURCE: Larsson, S.C., et al, “Total and specific fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of stroke: A prospective study,” Atherosclerosis March 2013; 227(1): 147-52.)

To read the complete article…..Click here

- Courtesy of PRWeb

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