Sugar And Type 2 Diabetes

obeseeatingFrom Your Health Journal…..A really great article and Q & A from one of my favorite writers, Nanci Hellmich of USA Today on the Detroit Free Press web site entitled Sugar availability linked to type 2 diabetes. I had to promote this article, as I feel it is very informative, educational, and well written. A recent study examined sugar and type 2 diabetes rates in 175 countries including the USA over the past decade and found that increased sugar availability in the food supply was associated with higher rates of type 2 diabetes. Please don’t read this and say “no kidding, isn’t that obvious.” The important finding from this study suggests that for every additional 150 calories of sugar (the amount in a 12-ounce can of soda) available per person per day, the incidence of type 2 diabetes rose by 1%. Does this mean it is a ’cause and effect’ – but nevertheless, it is an important finding. With obesity on the rise all over the world, type 2 diabetes is growing in many populations. Type 2 diabetes in most cases is environmental due to poor eating habits and less physical activity. For many, simply getting extra exercise, eating healthy portions – causing weight loss can result the elimination of type 2 diabetes. I encourage all of you to visit the Detroit Free Press web site (link provided below) to read the complete article and Q & A.”

From the article…..

Sugar is under the microscope again.

A recent study looked at sugar and type 2 diabetes rates in 175 countries including the USA over the past 10 years and found that increased sugar availability in the food supply was associated with higher rates of type 2 diabetes.

The research showed that for every additional 150 calories of sugar (the amount in a 12-ounce can of soda) available per person per day, the incidence of type 2 diabetes rose by 1%. Although the study doesn’t directly prove cause and effect, it has raised new concerns about sugar.

Almost 26 million U.S. adults and children have diabetes. In diabetes, the body does not make enough of the hormone insulin, or it doesn’t use it properly. Insulin helps glucose (sugar) get into cells, where it is used for energy. If there’s an insulin problem, sugar builds up in the blood, damaging nerves and blood vessels.

USA Today talked to the study’s lead author, Sanjay Basu, an assistant professor of medicine at Stanford Prevention Research Center. He’s a medical doctor and a statistician. The study was conducted while Basu was a medical resident at the University of California-San Francisco.

We also talked to endocrinologist Elizabeth Seaquist, president-elect of medicine and science for the American Diabetes Association and professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota Medical School.

To read the full article…..Click here

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